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RDT 295: Radiologic Science Seminar: Home

National Library of Medicine

The National Library of Medicine The National Library of Medicine (NLM), on the campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, is the world's largest medical library. The Library collects materials and provides information and research services in all areas of biomedicine and health care.

Associate Director

Paula Pini's picture
Paula Pini
Contact:
Great Path, M.S. #15, P.O. Box 1046 Manchester, CT 06045-1046
860.512.2877

Library Hours & Contacts

Library Hours

 

Semester Hours

Monday - Thursday: 8am - 8pm
Friday: 8am - 3pm
Saturday: 10am - 2pm
Sunday: CLOSED 

Hours vary when courses are not in session and during intersession. See complete hours listing »

Contact Us


Radiologic and MRI Technologists

radiologic technologists image

Radiologic technologists, also known as radiographers, perform diagnostic imaging examinations, such as x rays, on patients. MRI technologists operate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners to create diagnostic images. - Bureau of Labor Statistics

Finding Medical and Scientific Articles

The following subscription databases can be searched for reputable periodical articles dealing with health, medicine and science. Off campus access to the databases will require you to login to my.commnet.edu and to type in your NETID and password.

EBSCO Databases

GALE DATABASES

Finding Books

 

Use the MCC Online Catalog to find hard copy and electronic books as well as DVDs and CDs.  Books can be charged out for 3 weeks and can be renewed.

Plagiarism

What is Plagiarism?

 

Plagiarism is simply using someone's work and not acknowledging or giving credit to the original author(s).



I am plagiarizing if I:

  • Intentionally duplicate or copy another person's work including copying directly from an article, book, or website
  • Copy another student's assignment(s)
  • Paraphrase another person's work, while making only minor changes and not changing the meaning or ideas presented by the original author(s)
  • Copy sections of another person's work and piece these sections together to create a new whole
  • Turn in an assignment that has been previously submitted for assessment and then take credit for the assignment
  • Turn in an assignment as independent work when the assignment was produced in whole or part in collusion with another student(s), tutor(s), or person(s)